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The money

Αν είσαι κι αν δεν είσαι του δήμαρχου παιδίν
If you are and if you're not mayor's child
του δήμαρχου παιδί, ω, ω
mayor's child, oh, oh
εγιώ να σε φιλήσω κι ας κάμω φυλακήν
i will kiss you even if I go to the jail

Τα ριάλια, ριάλια, ριάλια
The money, the money, the money
τα σελίνια μονά και διπλά
the schillings odd and double
τα μονόλιρα, πεντόλιρα και πού ’ντα
one pounds, five pounds and where they are
ο πεζεβέγγης που τα ’χει στη πούγγα, ω, ω
the pimp that has them in his wallet, oh, oh

Εσύ ’σαι ο καθρέφτης, το καθαρόν γιαλίν
You are the mirror, the clear glass
το καθαρόν γιαλίν, ω, ω
the clear glass, oh, oh
που φέγγει στην Ευρώπην και στην Ανατολήν
that shins in Europe and in Orient

Ίντα τραγού'ιν να σου πω, μάνα μου να σ’ αρέσει
What song to tell you in order you to like it
μάνα μου να σ’ αρέσει, ω, ω
in order you to like it, oh, oh
που έχεις αγγελικόν κορμί και δαχτυλίδιν μέση
that you have angelic body and waist like ring

Στην σκάλα που ξεβαίνεις, να ξέβαινα κι εγιώ
The stair that you go down, I wish I would go it down too
να ξέβαινα κι εγιώ, ω, ω
I wish I would go it down too, oh, oh
και εις κάθε σκαλοπάτιν να σε γλυκοφιλώ
and in every step to kiss you tenderly
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@  Ajax : (25 January 2016 - 05:39 PM) Buckle up, gonna be an interesting financial year !
@  Ajax : (25 January 2016 - 05:38 PM) Ti petaxes ;;;

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GREEK CHEESES!


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#1 TheGreekMan

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 10:55 AM

This article made me think, wow did we know this many Greek cheeses existed? Better than that aussie malakia cheeses!

What's your favorite cheese and what are the uses you have them in.. other than just bread.. lol

I personally love cheese, but in moderation as I don't want to be a fat bastard!


The other Greek cheeses: Feta is best known, but the variety is endless Thursday, July 16, 2009 By Lauren Wadowsky Posted Image Andy Starnes/Post-Gazette Cheeses from Greece, clockwise from left: Feta, kefalotiri and graviera with oil-cured olives, all from Salonika Imports in Lawrenceville. <div class="story_body"> ATHENS -- On a trip to Greece three years ago, my host proudly told me that Greeks ate more cheese than any other nation in the European Union.

He was right; in 2005 Greeks ate 58.7 pounds of cheese per capita, just above the French.

Who knew? I must admit that one of my favorite Greek foods is cheese, and not just feta. Whether it's kasseri fried golden and sprinkled with lemon juice, ricotta-like manouri atop fresh salad greens, or mint-spiked halloumi, Greek cheese's variety and versatility never fail to stoke my amazement -- or my appetite. This is no exaggeration: Greece has hundreds of cheeses; nearly every village produces its own fresco tiri (fresh cheese) or hard sheep's milk cheese. They're great with cold cuts for a light lunch, but when combined with meat dishes or grated in pasta, their flavors improve 10-fold. With feta's popularity worldwide, it's surprising that other Greek cheeses are rather unknown outside Greece. Actually, there are many Greek cheeses besides feta available at Giant Eagle stores around Pittsburgh, at Costco and at Stamoolis Brothers, a Greek food importer in the Strip District. I think it's time we take a cue from the world's most enthusiastic cheese lovers and include some of their favorites into our cooking repertoires.

Unlike most Western cheeses, Greek cheeses are made from goat's or sheep's milk or a combination. Cow's milk cheeses are rare since historically, Greece's hilly topography made raising large cattle herds difficult. Today, shepherds' herds still wander country hillsides, freely nibbling wild grasses. The uncultivated greens are largely responsible for Greek cheese's diversity in flavors and textures from region to region. Each area has its particular grasses; some are misted by the salty Mediterranean, others are hardier due to innate dryness. Depending on what greens the animal eats, a sharper or milder cheese is produced.

Also, many cheese producers in Greece are small-scale. Although there are numerous industrial cheese manufacturers throughout Greece, recently smaller enterprises are surfacing. Dairy farmers who once sold their milk to cheese manufacturers are making cheese themselves. With rising feed costs and other animal-keeping expenses, the farmers find producing their own cheese (which they always did for personal use) more profitable than selling the milk to cheese companies. They continue making cheese as they did for themselves and lucky friends, but they have modernized the process so that the products can be sold in the Greek and foreign markets. Some believe that these cheeses are the best in taste and quality. In any case, many of the Greek cheeses imported to the United States are produced by such businesses.

Some of the most common Greek cheeses imported to the U.S. are halloumi, manouri, kasseri, graviera and, of course, feta. Below are descriptions of each:

Halloumi is traditionally a Cypriot cheese, but it is eaten widely in Greece and included in many recipes considered classically Greek. Made from sheep's and goat's milk, mild, firm-textured halloumi can be heated to high temperatures without losing its shape, making it perfect for grilling. Descriptions often term halloumi the "squeaky cheese" because of the sound it makes when you chew it. It's true. In Athens, marinated halloumi along with a roasted pepper relish makes a great sandwich on ciabatta bread. I've also seen halloumi on the dessert menu, drizzled with honey and topped with toasted walnuts.

Kasseri is similar to provolone but milder and more buttery in flavor. It is a cooked hard cheese produced from fresh kefalotiri (another Greek cheese). Kasseri is quite versatile and is used in casseroles, fried to make saganaki, grated on pasta, or eaten plain.

Manouri is a fresh, semi-soft white cheese similar to ricotta in texture, but milkier in flavor and harder. It is made from the whey reserved from feta production and has no rind. Manouri makes a great addition to salads, sandwiches and appetizers. It's also delicious with fruit preserves or honey for dessert.

Graviera is the Greek version of Gruyere but harder and more piquant. Made from sheep's and a bit of goat's milk, it is aged at least five months before being sent to market. Graviera is a great melting cheese and adapts beautifully to casseroles, vegetable dishes and risottos. It's also a wonderful table cheese and a great accompaniment to cold cuts.

Feta, Greece's most famous cheese, is sold fresh, usually packed in brine to ensure longer preservation. Feta is a "protected destination of origin" product in the EU; it must contain at least 70 percent sheep's milk and be produced in certain regions of Greece. American cheese companies can bypass such EU regulations and market cow's milk feta made in the U.S. Don't be fooled: Even if the feta you find is not from Greece, be sure that it is at least made from sheep's and goat's milk. Your friends and family will thank you!


Chicken, Feta and Ouzo Pasta PG tested

  • 1 cup ouzo or sambuca
  • 2 to 3 medium onions, thinly sliced
  • Pinch of crushed fennel seeds
  • 4 medium boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound shaped pasta, such as penne
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 tablespoon flour, packed
  • 2 egg yolks, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup feta cheese, crumbled
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1 cup reserved pasta water
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
In a large frying pan add 1/2 cup water, ouzo, onions, crushed fennel seeds and chicken. Bring to a simmer. When the liquids evaporate, add the butter and olive oil and brown the chicken, about 4 minutes.

Meanwhile, boil the pasta and drain, reserving 1 cup of pasta water. In a large saucepan over high heat, whisk together the milk and flour. Stir continuously until slightly thickened. Turn the heat to low and add the beaten egg yolks and a little salt. Stir in the feta, parsley and chicken mixture. Add the pasta carefully to the sauce, pouring in a little of the reserved pasta water if the sauce is too thick.

Season with salt and pepper; portion into pasta dishes.

Serve immediately.

-- Lauren Wadowsky



Greek Cheese Tart with Tomatoes PG tested

For crust

  • 3/4 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 1/4?cups all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 1 tablespoon basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup water
For filling

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons flour
  • 2 cups lukewarm milk
  • 1/2 pound kasseri cheese
  • 1/2 pound graviera cheese
  • 1 large tomato, sliced
Mix the first 7 ingredients together in a large bowl. Add the butter and rub into the flour mixture by hand until well mixed. Then add the egg and the water. Knead and form the dough into a ball. Roll into a large circle and fit into a 10-inch-diameter tart pan. Prick sides and bottom with a fork and bake at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes. Fill immediately.

For the filling:

In a deep saucepan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the flour, stir and cook until golden and bubbly. Lower heat to medium, pour in the milk gradually and stir continuously until thickened into a bechamel sauce. Add the cheeses and stir until melted. Immediately, pour 2/3 of sauce into tart crust. Arrange tomato slices on top, then drizzle with remaining sauce. Bake in a 400-degree oven until browned.

-- Lauren Wadowsky



Salad with Grilled Manouri and Toasted Pine Nuts
  • PG tested
  • 8 tablespoons olive oil (divided)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 6-ounce round of manouri cheese
  • 4 cups mixed greens
  • 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup dried currants or raisins
  • 3 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped
To prepare the dressing, combine 6 tablespoons of the olive oil with the vinegar, honey and salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

For the manouri, brush both sides of cheese round with remaining olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill on a grill pan over high heat until browned, about 30 seconds on each side. Reserve.

In a large salad bowl, toss the mixed greens, toasted pine nuts, raisins and parsley with the dressing. Place the manouri on top of the salad and serve.

-- Lauren Wadowsky

#2 TZAKI

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 11:13 AM

This article made me think, wow did we know this many Greek cheeses existed? Better than that aussie malakia cheeses!

What's your favorite cheese and what are the uses you have them in.. other than just bread.. lol

I personally love cheese, but in moderation as I don't want to be a fat bastard!


The other Greek cheeses: Feta is best known, but the variety is endless Thursday, July 16, 2009 By Lauren Wadowsky Posted Image Andy Starnes/Post-Gazette Cheeses from Greece, clockwise from left: Feta, kefalotiri and graviera with oil-cured olives, all from Salonika Imports in Lawrenceville. <div class="story_body"> ATHENS -- On a trip to Greece three years ago, my host proudly told me that Greeks ate more cheese than any other nation in the European Union.

He was right; in 2005 Greeks ate 58.7 pounds of cheese per capita, just above the French.

Who knew? I must admit that one of my favorite Greek foods is cheese, and not just feta. Whether it's kasseri fried golden and sprinkled with lemon juice, ricotta-like manouri atop fresh salad greens, or mint-spiked halloumi, Greek cheese's variety and versatility never fail to stoke my amazement -- or my appetite. This is no exaggeration: Greece has hundreds of cheeses; nearly every village produces its own fresco tiri (fresh cheese) or hard sheep's milk cheese. They're great with cold cuts for a light lunch, but when combined with meat dishes or grated in pasta, their flavors improve 10-fold. With feta's popularity worldwide, it's surprising that other Greek cheeses are rather unknown outside Greece. Actually, there are many Greek cheeses besides feta available at Giant Eagle stores around Pittsburgh, at Costco and at Stamoolis Brothers, a Greek food importer in the Strip District. I think it's time we take a cue from the world's most enthusiastic cheese lovers and include some of their favorites into our cooking repertoires.

Unlike most Western cheeses, Greek cheeses are made from goat's or sheep's milk or a combination. Cow's milk cheeses are rare since historically, Greece's hilly topography made raising large cattle herds difficult. Today, shepherds' herds still wander country hillsides, freely nibbling wild grasses. The uncultivated greens are largely responsible for Greek cheese's diversity in flavors and textures from region to region. Each area has its particular grasses; some are misted by the salty Mediterranean, others are hardier due to innate dryness. Depending on what greens the animal eats, a sharper or milder cheese is produced.

Also, many cheese producers in Greece are small-scale. Although there are numerous industrial cheese manufacturers throughout Greece, recently smaller enterprises are surfacing. Dairy farmers who once sold their milk to cheese manufacturers are making cheese themselves. With rising feed costs and other animal-keeping expenses, the farmers find producing their own cheese (which they always did for personal use) more profitable than selling the milk to cheese companies. They continue making cheese as they did for themselves and lucky friends, but they have modernized the process so that the products can be sold in the Greek and foreign markets. Some believe that these cheeses are the best in taste and quality. In any case, many of the Greek cheeses imported to the United States are produced by such businesses.

Some of the most common Greek cheeses imported to the U.S. are halloumi, manouri, kasseri, graviera and, of course, feta. Below are descriptions of each:

Halloumi is traditionally a Cypriot cheese, but it is eaten widely in Greece and included in many recipes considered classically Greek. Made from sheep's and goat's milk, mild, firm-textured halloumi can be heated to high temperatures without losing its shape, making it perfect for grilling. Descriptions often term halloumi the "squeaky cheese" because of the sound it makes when you chew it. It's true. In Athens, marinated halloumi along with a roasted pepper relish makes a great sandwich on ciabatta bread. I've also seen halloumi on the dessert menu, drizzled with honey and topped with toasted walnuts.

Kasseri is similar to provolone but milder and more buttery in flavor. It is a cooked hard cheese produced from fresh kefalotiri (another Greek cheese). Kasseri is quite versatile and is used in casseroles, fried to make saganaki, grated on pasta, or eaten plain.

Manouri is a fresh, semi-soft white cheese similar to ricotta in texture, but milkier in flavor and harder. It is made from the whey reserved from feta production and has no rind. Manouri makes a great addition to salads, sandwiches and appetizers. It's also delicious with fruit preserves or honey for dessert.

Graviera is the Greek version of Gruyere but harder and more piquant. Made from sheep's and a bit of goat's milk, it is aged at least five months before being sent to market. Graviera is a great melting cheese and adapts beautifully to casseroles, vegetable dishes and risottos. It's also a wonderful table cheese and a great accompaniment to cold cuts.

Feta, Greece's most famous cheese, is sold fresh, usually packed in brine to ensure longer preservation. Feta is a "protected destination of origin" product in the EU; it must contain at least 70 percent sheep's milk and be produced in certain regions of Greece. American cheese companies can bypass such EU regulations and market cow's milk feta made in the U.S. Don't be fooled: Even if the feta you find is not from Greece, be sure that it is at least made from sheep's and goat's milk. Your friends and family will thank you!


Chicken, Feta and Ouzo Pasta PG tested

  • 1 cup ouzo or sambuca
  • 2 to 3 medium onions, thinly sliced
  • Pinch of crushed fennel seeds
  • 4 medium boneless, skinless chicken breasts cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound shaped pasta, such as penne
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 1 tablespoon flour, packed
  • 2 egg yolks, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup feta cheese, crumbled
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1 cup reserved pasta water
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
In a large frying pan add 1/2 cup water, ouzo, onions, crushed fennel seeds and chicken. Bring to a simmer. When the liquids evaporate, add the butter and olive oil and brown the chicken, about 4 minutes.

Meanwhile, boil the pasta and drain, reserving 1 cup of pasta water. In a large saucepan over high heat, whisk together the milk and flour. Stir continuously until slightly thickened. Turn the heat to low and add the beaten egg yolks and a little salt. Stir in the feta, parsley and chicken mixture. Add the pasta carefully to the sauce, pouring in a little of the reserved pasta water if the sauce is too thick.

Season with salt and pepper; portion into pasta dishes.

Serve immediately.

-- Lauren Wadowsky



Greek Cheese Tart with Tomatoes PG tested

For crust

  • 3/4 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 1/4?cups all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 1 tablespoon basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup water
For filling

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons flour
  • 2 cups lukewarm milk
  • 1/2 pound kasseri cheese
  • 1/2 pound graviera cheese
  • 1 large tomato, sliced
Mix the first 7 ingredients together in a large bowl. Add the butter and rub into the flour mixture by hand until well mixed. Then add the egg and the water. Knead and form the dough into a ball. Roll into a large circle and fit into a 10-inch-diameter tart pan. Prick sides and bottom with a fork and bake at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes. Fill immediately.

For the filling:

In a deep saucepan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the flour, stir and cook until golden and bubbly. Lower heat to medium, pour in the milk gradually and stir continuously until thickened into a bechamel sauce. Add the cheeses and stir until melted. Immediately, pour 2/3 of sauce into tart crust. Arrange tomato slices on top, then drizzle with remaining sauce. Bake in a 400-degree oven until browned.

-- Lauren Wadowsky



Salad with Grilled Manouri and Toasted Pine Nuts
  • PG tested
  • 8 tablespoons olive oil (divided)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 6-ounce round of manouri cheese
  • 4 cups mixed greens
  • 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup dried currants or raisins
  • 3 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped
To prepare the dressing, combine 6 tablespoons of the olive oil with the vinegar, honey and salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

For the manouri, brush both sides of cheese round with remaining olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill on a grill pan over high heat until browned, about 30 seconds on each side. Reserve.

In a large salad bowl, toss the mixed greens, toasted pine nuts, raisins and parsley with the dressing. Place the manouri on top of the salad and serve.

-- Lauren Wadowsky



yum

I must admit i haven't heard of manouri before.

#3 TheGreekMan

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 11:40 AM

Yeah and I really like Ricotta.

I actually like the goat cheeses, that taste is really nice.

Are you a good cook Tzaki, what cooking suggestions do you have?

Edited by TheGreekMan, 18 July 2009 - 11:41 AM.


#4 TZAKI

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 01:55 PM

yeah I really like Ricotta.

I actually like the goat cheeses, that taste is really nice.

Are you a good cook Tzaki, what cooking suggestions do you have?


I love ricotta as well, I make ricotta, pizza, ricotta/pecorino cannelloni, i make ricotta omelets, ricotta tiropites. ricotta on toast with banana and honey and cinnamon , or ricotta on toast with strawberries, Ricotta avocado and smoked salmon...

Truthfully, i think im a bad cook, i want to go and do some cooking classes, im very board with my cooking.

My newest dish that i make lately is thai pumpkin soup with crab or prawns.

800gms pumpkin soup
2 tablespoon red curry paste
chilli
1 teaspoon fresh ginger grated
3 shallots
2 ripe tomatoes
coconut cream

mix curry paste
ginger
shallots
tomatoes till they soften, add pumpkin and 3 cups of stock cook till pumpkin is soft, mash or put through blender bring back to the pot and add coconut milk, Pour pumpkin soup in bowl then garnish with fresh crab or prawns.

Its not a bad recipe you can add chili to your taste.

Im already bored of this recipe and looking for some new ones.. This summer i will definitely being doing some cooking classes!!

Edited by TZAKI, 18 July 2009 - 01:56 PM.


#5 DemiK

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 12:41 AM

I am a cheese addict! I I love all cheeses but especially greek cheese's and my ultimate fav is a good matured goats cheese that you can grate into a spanakopita! If I don't taste the goat's cheese - it's an automatic BLIAX!



Fav platter is a few different types of cheeses, grapes, whole green fig preserve, a good cracker and a glass of Pinot Noir, if I'm eating greek cheeses!


I also love making mizithra and sprinkling crushed walnuts & pistachio nuts with a whole lot of honey ontop!


*.....heading off to the fridge :)

#6 Kretan

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 11:28 AM

mmm Cretan Mizithra

#7 ΜΑΝΙΑΤΗΣ

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 06:41 PM

Cheese: the ultimate delicacy.

#8 foxyminc

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 10:55 PM

I like most Greek cheese Kefalotyri, feta, kasseri are my favourites.
I also like the Australian Blue Vein cheese, brie and harvati cheese.
Cheese is a great source of vitamins, calcium, etc. but like all foods, moderation is key.
:)

#9 bubblytee

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 01:34 PM

I am a cheese addict! I I love all cheeses but especially greek cheese's and my ultimate fav is a good matured goats cheese that you can grate into a spanakopita! If I don't taste the goat's cheese - it's an automatic BLIAX!



Fav platter is a few different types of cheeses, grapes, whole green fig preserve, a good cracker and a glass of Pinot Noir, if I'm eating greek cheeses!


I also love making mizithra and sprinkling crushed walnuts & pistachio nuts with a whole lot of honey ontop!


*.....heading off to the fridge Posted Image



you know what goes good with that? a simple baked ricotta with roasted capsicum and a liiittle bit of sundried tomatoes, slice it up and add to platter i love cabanossi tooo...


graviera is great in the tiropites too or this other dish i made once it had gravviera pasta a filo with simolina and milk mi me rotas ti intav it tasted good...

i think my favourite cheeses though are the ones you find in the little boutiques in the middle of no where australia has some yummy produce!


but im the same i looooove goats milk feta so much sharper and more bite!

#10 TZAKI

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 11:40 AM

Recently i went to Richmond Hill Cafe and Larder. One of my favourit places.

Check out the cheese room yummmmmmmmm. you walk in the Lader its all behind glass walls, the smell is wow punget bet heavenly.

one of my favourit snacks

Richmond Hill’s famous, grilled cheesy toast
with spicy RHCL Eggplant & Chilli Pickle

there are 3 cheeses on it its delish...

http://www.rhcl.com.au/

Edited by TZAKI, 07 May 2010 - 11:55 AM.


#11 Dvs

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 02:46 PM

Hey this is pretty good. I eat alot of cheese. lol

#12 Latex

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:19 PM

more oreksi pou tin exete to read all that lolllllllll
zhtoooooooooo dodoni




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